In the Name of Allah, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful
Grande Strategy

Website Review: A Common Word



12/6/2010
Meinhaj Hussain, m.hussain@grandestrategy.com

A Common Word is a website / blog by a brother who converted to Islam on March 3rd, 1993 at the Islamic Society of North America in Plainfield, Indiana. He prefers to go by the name of Grand Verbalizer 19. As someone who has come to the faith through reflection and research and by the guidance of Allah, his writings are most refreshing and thoughtful.


What is so great about this brother and what can he contribute?
The brother brings a polemic and apologetic viewpoint, a perspective somewhat underdeveloped within our general da'wah repertoire.
His writings are focused on faith and the Christian-Muslim debate. Given the absence of a polemic and apologetic approach within our da'wah efforts, our brother's contribution is unique and worthy of attention. Our brother notes that we Muslims have been overly reliant of Sheikh Ahmed Deedat. 
 

I will let our brother tell us about his own journey to Islam below:


One day I came into contact with a very amazing man whom was speaking to a group of people and uttering words that were quite foreign to my ears. I heard this man speak of the words: Islam, Qur'an, and Muhammed.


When I started to engage this man he simply asked me if I believed if Jesus was God. I replied to him, "Yes Jesus is God!" He (being an African American) asked me what colour is Jesus? I replied, "Jesus is white like me." He than inquired, "How come he's not black like me?" This made me retort, "Well than, what colour is your Allah?" He gave the response that forever changed my life. "Allah is not black or white, in fact Allah does not have parents or children".

At this juncture a light clicked on. That's God! That makes absolute sense! We as human beings need children to carry on our species but God is ever living and never dies.


I was than entrusted with a copy of the Qur'an. There were two verses in the Qur'an that were quite appealing to me. The first verse that stood out automatically was the verse that says, "Do you think that Ibrahim was a Jew or a Christian no he was upon the natural way."


This was very fascinating for me and also added up. Christianity begins with the birth, "death" and "resurrection" of Jesus. Judaism has it's origin with the Torah and the law of Moses.


However, Abraham preceded both. Islam is calling humanity back to something primordial was the feeling I was getting from this reading.


The second verse that was fascinating for me was the verse that said, "We have sent a prophet to every nation some we have mentioned and some we have not." This also answered a very complicated theological issue I had with my familiarity of Christian doctrine. What happened to all those people who lived and died and never heard that Christ Jesus was their lord and savior? "Well son don't worry about them their in hell!" Says, the Calvinist.


Well, I did worry about them. I worried about the justice of God involved in this scenario. However, the message of the Qur'an was comforting that God from the very beginning was interested with the whole of his creation and not just a select group.


Christians may think it's a major sales point to say, "I know I am saved by the blood of Jesus, and I'm not going to hell." That's well and all but I love the more humble position of the Muslim who says, I can not say that just because you are not a Muslim you will go to hell. I also cannot say that just because I am a Muslim and wear this label that I am given an automatic ticket to heaven.


Our brother's political views are pro-khilafah, pro-unity and against secularism. He defines himself as a Sunni, Maliki, Maturdi and Qadiri (regarding tasawuf) although he notes that he can differ from these positions and take from others.

Our brother warns us not to be divided and intolerant. He warns us against certain groups within us that are.
Vision Without Glasses

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